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Bronxville School's Director of Counseling Services, Anne Abbatecola, To Retire PDF Print Email

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By Katherine Outcalt

Aug. 12, 2020: Anne Abbatecola, Bronxville School's Director of Counseling Services, will retire after 15 years in the district.

Abbatecola began her career in education as a French teacher to middle and high school students in the Mount Vernon School system.

Recognizing, early on, her love for education, Abbatecola attended Teachers College at Columbia University in the evenings and summers to earn her masters degree and state certification in school counseling. To be able to impact the planning and implementation of school programming, Abbatecola sought further graduate study in school administration and earned certification in that area as well 

After taking a short break to raise her three children, Abbatecola began her career in counseling in the Eastchester schools as a middle school counselor and then moved to the high school where she served as Director of Counseling for seven years. 

She then spent 14 years as Director of Counseling in Harrison before coming to Bronxville. "I became interested in the Bronxville School because of its fine reputation, and I had knowledge of the area since I lived nearby," said Abbatecola. She completed her 15th year as Bronxville's Director of Counseling Services this past June.

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As Director, Abbatecola managed a caseload of students while running a busy counseling department. Bronxville guidance counselor Ellen Cohen commented, "I am privileged to have worked alongside Anne for the entirety of my counseling career in Bronxville. No matter what situation arises, Anne looks at things with a lens to find what would bring out the best for students." 

In her 15 years, Abbatecola introduced several student-centered programs, including individual portfolios in grade 9, which offers students the opportunity to highlight one of the dispositions they demonstrate through their classwork. Due to its success, the portfolio program has expanded to each school in the district. It is also a culminating project in the WISE program. The WISE program allows seniors to participate in an internship or personal project in place of regular school during part of senior year.

Bronxville's Freshman Transition Program is another Abbatecola addition. The program pairs freshmen with seniors who serve as mentors to students who are making the transition from middle to high school. It is a cornerstone of the Bronxville experience. Equally as impactful have been Abbatecola's Junior Workshops - a series of classes every junior takes second semester that focuses solely on the college process and post high school planning. 

Abbatecola has found time management to be the most challenging part of her career. While never opposed to long hours, she made it a priority to devote the school day to her students, teachers, and parents and save much of the administrative work after school. 

She also found the need to be creative in meeting the needs of her very scheduled students. Abbatecola recalls one student who would stop by after soccer practice to catch up and another who frequently came by with an idea or thought to share during a break in play practice. 

It's the day to day energy of her students that Abbatecola says she will miss most, along with her tireless support staff, Carol Lockwood, Roseanne Silves, and Liz Chiaverini, who helped keep things organized. She will also miss the privilege of reading every graduating senior's name at graduation, which she has done for the last 15 years. 

Bronxville High School principal, Anne Meyer, commented, "Anne's knowledge of the district and the student body will be missed. She is the go-to person when it comes to discussing new ideas because she is able to provide insights about what has been successful in the past. It is clear that Anne cares deeply about Bronxville, and we will miss her commitment to our students, our school, and our community."  

Mrs. Abbatecola's last day will be November 1.


Photos courtesy A. Abbatecola

 

  

 

  

 

 
August 12, 2020 Photo of the Week & Events Coming Up PDF Print Email

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Beautiful flowers. Photo by N.Bower

Aug. 12, 2020: Below is information about upcoming and ongoing events. If you would like to be included, please send event information to CLOAKING

Upcoming Events

Aug. 19, 2020: On Wednesday, August 19th from 10:30am-11:30am, Gramatan Village will present in conjunction with New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital a virtual workshop on Falls Prevention led by licensed physical therapist Grace Kulinski. This event is free and open to the public. To register for the workshop, please call Gramatan Village at (914) 337-1338 or click here.

Aug. 21, 2020: On Friday, Aug. 21, from 10:30 am-11:30 am, Gramatan Village is hosting a fun National Senior Citizens Day Celebration for all seniors throughout Westchester County. The celebration will include three special guests: County Executive George Latimer, Bronxville Mayor Mary Marvin, and State Senator Shelley B. Mayer. Participants will have the opportunity to chat with our elected officials and each other as we make new friends and celebrate decades of life. This Zoom event is free and open to the public. All are welcome. Click here to register for this lively celebration or call Gramatan Village at (914) 337-1338.

Events in Later Months

October: Due to the continuing uncertainty of the COVID-19 situation, The Counseling Center is canceling its 2020 benefit, scheduled for October 17. They are instead hosting a lively, interactive online event in October with opportunities to support the work of The Counseling Center. Details will follow. A grand in-person 49/50th Anniversary Benefit with special honorees is scheduled for May 7, 2021, at the Bronxville Field Club.

October 6, 2020: The Community Fund Annual Golf Outing. For more information, contact Amy Korb, Executive Director, The Community Fund of Bronxville, Eastchester, and Tuckahoe at 914.337.8808.

October 15, 2020: Senior Citizens Council 50th Anniversary Benefit 

November 7, 2020: Take Back Day.  In the meantime, you can bring paper for shredding (up to four boxes), electronic waste, and other hazardous waste to the Household Materials Recovery Facility (H-MRF), 15 Woods Road, Valhalla. For details on what is accepted and to make an appointment, call 914-813-5400 or click here.

May, 2021: Gramatan Village May Magic Event

 
Local COVID-19 News This Week: Governor Cuomo Named Chair of National Governors Association PDF Print Email

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By Staff

Aug. 12, 2020: This past week, Governor Cuomo became the Chair of the National Governors Association. Cuomo said that this year, they would focus on "America's Recovery and Revival in the face of this devastating pandemic."

Governor Cuomo said that around the country, due to COVID, "one death occurs every 80 seconds." He further said that "as we look ahead, all 50 states, and the federal government, must institutionalize what we have learned, so we are better prepared."

You can view the COVID stats for Westchester County and the State on N.Y. State COVID-19 Tracker. 

Below is other local COVID-19 news this week.

On August 5, 2020,  Governor Cuomo said that, for the first time in 87 years, The "Christmas Spectacular" at Radio City Music Hall would be canceled due to COVID-19. He also said that the Rockefeller Ice Rink "has transformed into an outdoor dining space. The "Summer at the Rink" offers outdoor dining for restaurants like the famous Rainbow Room and Alidoro, with others soon to follow."

On August 10, 2020, Governor Cuomo said that the total hospitalizations in New York State are at a record low of 535 and that the State conducted 54,002 tests the previous day, of which .88% were positive.

He also said that the State is providing Mental Health services to help New Yorkers affected by the pandemic.  "The program, called Coping Circles, consists of free six-week support group sessions, facilitated by volunteer licensed mental health professionals, that are available to all New Yorkers ages 18 and up. Click here to learn more.

On August 11, 2020, Governor Cuomo said that two additional states (Hawaii and South Dakota) and the Virgin Islands were added to NY's COVID travel advisory. See the full list of states and territories subject to the travel advisory here

He also said that on August 11, the Yankees, the Mets and the Blue Jays all played games in New York State.  He also said that the Toronto Blue Jays would play most home games this season at Buffalo's Sahlen Field.

 

Photo courtesy Bronxville Police Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





 
Mary Anne Rittenhouse Passed Away on August 5, 2020 PDF Print Email

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By the family

Aug. 12, 2020: Mary Anne Rittenhouse, of Bronxville, passed away on August 5, 2020. Beloved partner of Michael Baker, loving mother of Mariel (Peter) Goodson, Timmy Rittenhouse, and Christopher Rittenhouse, devoted Nana to Teddy, Ollie, and Henry Goodson.

After graduating from Sarah Lawrence College, Mary Anne served as the Orthopedic Coordinator at Lawrence Hospital for 20 years, where she was beloved by her patients and co-workers.

A woman of many talents, Mary Anne was particularly proud of her ability to tackle the Sunday Times crossword puzzle in ink, in one sitting.

When she wasn't sharpening her vocabulary skills - or her quick wit - she could usually be found horseback riding, Soul-Cycling, or chasing her "Mansters" around the Hilltop.

Memorial Calling hours will be held at the Fred H. McGrath & Son Funeral Home, Bronxville, between the hours of 2 - 4 pm and 6 - 8 pm on Friday, August 14th.

A Memorial Service will be held at The Reformed Church of Bronxville on Saturday, August 15th, at 11 am.

In compliance with CDC and local health guidelines, the church will only be able to accommodate 125 people in the Sanctuary (approximately 25% of capacity.) Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis. Note that masks are required for all attendees.

The church is pleased to offer the service livestream. You may watch by clicking here.









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From The Mayor: Thank You For Your Help, Kindness, and Patience During Power Outage PDF Print Email

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Aug. 12, 2020: To my fellow residents and friends,

I felt compelled to write to say thank you to all of you on Tanglewylde Avenue, Parkway Road, The Byway, The High Road, Homesdale Road, North Way, the Hilltop and in so many other corners of the village who were without power for almost a week but handled it with grace, patience, kindness, a needed touch of humor, and an appreciation of the sometimes absurd.

It is such a testament to our village. It's why it is such an enormous honor to be your Mayor. I continue to stand in awe of the people I am privileged to serve.

I want to express particular gratitude to Jim Palmer, our village Administrator, who spent his entire weekend in the village chasing down power crews. He even delivered pizzas to the incredible gentlemen from Washington State who worked on Tanglewylde Avenue and Library Lane at day's end.

Everyone in village government gave it their all to make sure that we got service as fast as we possibly could for you.

This week can serve as a template of how a village of fine people can handle things with unity and grace.

Deep felt thanks,

Mary Marvin

Photo by A. Warner

 

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.






 
Zelenia Felipe of NYP-Lawrence Hospital Reflects on COVID-19 Battle PDF Print Email

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By Zelenia Felipe, medical-surgical oncology nurse, NYP-Lawrence Hospital

Aug. 12, 2020: As NewYork-Presbyterian marks the 150th day in its battle against COVID-19 on July 29, 10 front-line workers reflect on the harrowing, heroic, and heartbreaking experiences they witnessed. They describe the challenges they faced, the courage they summoned, and the love and hope that still keep them going as the pandemic rages on.

As a medical-surgical oncology nurse for NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, I thought there was no bigger fight than cancer. Cancer was the “Big C” and something I helped my patients desperately fight every day.

But a few months ago, we discovered another Big C: COVID-19. Having seen my patients fight cancer, I’ve learned the true strength of the human body and spirit. It’s that same strength and spirit that I know will not let COVID-19 win; the same strength and spirit that nurses carry every day as we walk into the hospital and put on our scrubs and PPE to begin our fight.

As I reflect on this time, I think of the team I have behind me, next to me, and in front of me on the front line of this COVID-19 battlefield. I think of every doctor, nurse, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, nursing assistant, patient care tech, patient advocate, physical and occupational therapist, pharmacist, pastoral care worker, social worker, case manager, dietitian, rapid response team, phlebotomist, lab tech, nutritionist, transporter, unit clerk, housekeeper, radiologist, respiratory therapist, pathologist, volunteer, environmental services staff, administration personnel, supervisor, and manager.

I think of them and the team we have built together over these past few months as we have all faced this challenge together. This battle would not have been fought at this rate had it not been for our teamwork and the work of our communities coming together to join us.

Click on the photo below to watch a video of Zelenia

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Click here to read more stories from NYP First Responders.

Photo courtesy NewYork-Presbyterian Health Matters

 


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.







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Young Bronxville Mountain Biker Takes Win at First Race of the Season PDF Print Email

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By guest contributor

Aug. 19, 2020:  Logan Arthurs, a 12-year-old mountain biker from Bronxville, won the opening round of the Maxxis Eastern States Cup Series at Blue Mountain Bike Park in Pennsylvania on July 19.

The race, which was in the discipline of downhill mountain biking, involved a timed run down the steepest and most treacherous route on the hill.

The racers had to negotiate jagged rocks, thick roots, and large jumps, including one where they had to clear a road gap. The 130 racers all competed on the same course.

Logan is no stranger to the top of the podium. He has won his first race of the year each of the past four years. In a normal race season, Logan would compete in twelve races in the Northeast and Whistler, Canada. However, due to COVID-19 and the travel restrictions put in place by the various states, this year’s season will most likely be significantly abbreviated.

Logan is sponsored by several companies, including GoPro, and rides for Danny’s Cycles Racing, whose support was crucial leading up to the race and over the weekend at Blue Mountain.

“Logan is a passionate racer, and we really enjoy having him part of the team,” says Danny’s Cycles President Steve Kahn. “It gives us great pleasure to support people on bikes, whether it’s our accomplished and dedicated race team or someone coming
into one of our stores buying their first bike.”

While the remainder of the race season is in limbo, and possibly on hiatus, Logan’s time on the bike is not. He can be found on local trails at Sprain Ridge Park and Graham Hills, or at Mountain Creek Bike Park in New Jersey, tearing up the largest jumps.

You can follow Logan’s progress on Instagram @loganrides1

Photo courtesy L. Vioni


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
Richard Detwiler Wins Literary Contest PDF Print Email

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By Irena Choi Stern, Board member, Friends of the Bronxville Public Library

Aug. 12, 2020: Richard Detwiler was declared the winner of a literary contest, sponsored by the Friends of the Bronxville Public Library (FOBPL), by submitting “the best opening line of a well known novel, adjusted to the age of coronavirus.”

Detwiler’s winning entry is: Someone must have been breathing near Josef K., he knew he had done nothing wrong but, one morning, he was infected. -- “The Trial” by Franz Kafka.

Detwiler will receive signed copies of “Pachinko” and “Free Food for Millionaires” by Min Jin Lee, donated by the author to the Friends of the Bronxville Public Library for its March benefit, which was cancelled due to the coronavirus.

“We thank everyone for entering the contest, and we are especially grateful to author Min Jin Lee for her support for our library,” said Dina Grant, president of the FOBPL Board. “We had so many terrific entries, that it wasn’t an easy decision for the Board.”

Other contenders included:

It was the worst of times. That's basically it. -- “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of virus, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of community spread, it was the epoch of containment, it was the season of pandemic, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of masks, it was the winter of despair… -- “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. -- “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens

Papa, where are you going with that mask? -- “Charlotte’s Web” by E.B. White

Through the fence, between the curling flower spaces, I could see them social-distancing. -- “The Sound and the Fury” by William Faulkner

For a long time, I went to bed early, because there was nothing else to do while sheltering in place. — “Swann's Way” by Marcel Proust

Call me COVID-19. — “Moby Dick” by Herman Melville

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is quarantined. — “Anna Karenina” by Leo Tolstoy

We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the coronavirus began to take hold. -- “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” by Hunter S. Thompson

We were somewhere around Bleecker on the edge of the sidewalk when the virus began to take hold. -- “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” by Hunter S. Thompson

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a vaccine. -- “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen

I am seated in a home office, surrounded by no heads and bodies. -- “Infinite Jest” by David Foster Wallace

Corona, light of my life, fire of my loins. - “Lolita” by Vladimir Nabakov


Pictured: Richard and Barbara Detwiler

Photo courtesy Friends of the Bronxville Library

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.


 
Gramatan Village To Host Two Virtual Events: Falls Prevention Workshop & National Seniors Day Celebration PDF Print Email

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By Sherry Saturno, Executive Director, Gramatan Village

Aug. 12, 2020: Gramatan Village will host two virtual events in August.

Falls Prevention Workshop

On Wednesday, August 19th from 10:30am-11:30am, Gramatan Village will present in conjunction with New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital a virtual workshop on Falls Prevention led by licensed physical therapist Grace Kulinski.

This event is free and open to the public.

To register for the workshop, please call Gramatan Village at (914) 337-1338 or click here.

National Senior Citizens Day Celebration

On Friday, Aug. 21, from 10:30 am-11:30 am, Gramatan Village is hosting a fun National Senior Citizens Day Celebration for all seniors throughout Westchester County.

The celebration will include three special guests: County Executive George Latimer, Bronxville Mayor Mary Marvin, and State Senator Shelley B. Mayer. 

Participants will have the opportunity to chat with our elected officials and each other as we make new friends and celebrate decades of life.

This Zoom event is free and open to the public. All are welcome.

Click here to register for this lively celebration or call Gramatan Village at (914) 337-1338.


Photo courtesy Gramatan Village


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.


 

 
Help Improve the Local Ecology by Reducing Invasive Species PDF Print Email

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By Ellen Edwards, Chair, Bronxville Green Committee

Aug. 12, 2020: Recently, I spent five separate mornings in a canoe, wet through and filthy, pulling endless numbers of the invasive plants called water chestnut from three different lakes. Water chestnut is a large rosette plant with yards of long, tangled roots. By the end of each expedition, my mask was dark with dirt, leaf mold was clinging to my arms, and my sneakers were full of muck. I felt great!

Removing 15 Truckloads of Water Chesnuts

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I was part of a team of volunteers helping the Westchester Parks Foundation remove this invasive aquatic plant from lakes in Blue Mountain Reservation in Peekskill, Eastchester's Twin Lakes, and Tibbetts Brook Park in Yonkers. 

Led by Erin Cordiner, Director of Volunteer Programs, and Adam Lappman, Volunteer Coordinator, we hoped to make a dent in vegetation that completely covered most of the lakes' surfaces, limiting fishing and making boating impossible. 

Water chestnuts were robbing each lake of light and oxygen essential for its continued existence. Without our help, no native plants would survive, depriving the lake of food for fish and other aquatic life.

Although our efforts didn't seem to make much of a dent in the thick mat of vegetation, Erin assured us our hard work was an important part of a multi-year effort. She said that eradicating the water chestnut would take ten to twelve years, but as long as much of it was cleared out each year, we'd be making progress. 

At Tibbetts Brook Park, Erin said, "The ultimate goal is to bring back this lake, to restore it for ecological reasons and for the community."

This summer, Erin estimated that her teams had removed fifteen truckloads of water chestnut rosettes--thousands and thousands of plants. Each of these plants had the potential to drop twenty seeds into the lake bottom, where each could produce up to twenty more seeds. Hundreds of volunteers had made this possible.

After spending months inside, too much of it in front of a computer, I welcomed the opportunity to be outside in attractive settings doing physical labor that, unlike my indoor exercise routine, served a useful purpose. 

I'd felt similarly tired but exalted a couple of weeks earlier after spending three hours in Rye's Read Sanctuary (next to Playland), pulling the invasive land plants mugwort, porcelain berry, and knotweed. We filled 44 large garbage bags with plant material, and 

Erin assured us that whatever invasives returned to the area that we had cleared would be weakened. I felt energized and eager to invite others to join the effort.

What Invasive Plants Due to the Ecology

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Plants native to our area have evolved to fit our particular soil, temperature, and general ecology. They work together to fill different ecological niches, resulting in a healthy diversity. They are uniquely suited to provide our local insects, birds, and animals with the specific habitat and food they need. The rich variety of native plants makes the ecology of the area more resilient. If one plant dies off for whatever reason, many others remain to fill in.

In contrast, invasive plants come from somewhere else. They have not evolved to fit our particular ecology; instead, they often come to dominate it, wiping out the native plants as they ferociously reproduce. Local insects and animals lose their food and habitat. We lose the pleasure of a multitude of plants, each with its own delights.

Westchester County has a serious problem with invasive plants. You can see a blanket of vines shrouding trees and shrubs from most local highways. These vines are invasive species choking out the native vegetation. 

Unless action is taken to kill invasive vegetation, the plants that they are matting and strangling will eventually die. Invasive species are a visible sign of an unhealthy ecology. Yet the evidence of the full range of invasive species is often not always visible. 

On a webinar produced by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), I learned that invasives can include animals, insects, and pathogens as well as plants. 

According to the DEC's Emma Antolos, the emerald ash borer has infected 8-9% of ash trees in New York State. Since there is no defense against this invasive insect, it's expected that most ash trees in North America will eventually die. This will adversely affect the ecological health of our forests for decades to come. Wood from Ash Trees has long been used to make furniture and baseball bats. Indigenous people in New England use ash splits in the ancient art of basket weaving.

Where Invasive Species Comes From

Controlling the spread of invasive species is notoriously difficult.

International trade is a big culprit. Invasives of all kinds hitch rides on cargo containers. They are in the ballast water that's pumped into local waterways before a full load of cargo is taken aboard, on the hulls of private boats, and even on your own possessions as you move from one region to another. 

Wooden pallets used in shipping often harbor invasive insects. Even firewood taken from an upstate vacation home to a main residence down-state can transport invasive insects or seeds. A state law banning the transport of firewood more than fifty miles attempts to address this concern. 

The plant nursery trade is often a source of invasives. Ornamental plants that look lovely in a home's landscaping sometimes originate far away. They can spread far beyond residential borders into parkland and forests, where they lack predators and other deterrents. Often such plants can survive in a wide geographical range. For example, a plant that can tolerate salt might thrive along highways where salt is used for snow and ice removal. Like the water chestnut, some invasives also have a reproductive advantage.

When people dump the contents of aquariums into rivers and lakes, they also disturb the ecosystem. In some parts of Westchester, native fish are now competing with aquarium-raised goldfish for food and space.

How We Can Help Reduce Invasive Species

The DEC and the Westchester Parks Foundation can't do much about the birds, animals, and wind that spread the seeds of invasive plants, but they're encouraging us to help address the problem in the following ways:

-Respect regulations aimed at limiting inadvertent human transportation of invasives. These regulations include the rule about firewood and the requirement that watercraft (including all water gear such as paddleboards and diving equipment) be thoroughly cleaned, drained, and dried before entering a new water body.  

The same goes for hiking and camping gear. Footwear, clothes, and all camping and hiking gear should be cleaned as soon as the campers or hikers get home and well before the equipment is used on another outing.

-Plant native species in our yards. Be sure to examine all random seed mixes to make sure they don't include potential invasives.

-Don't release exotic pets and plants into the natural world.

-Consider joining a local chapter of the Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (PRISM).

-Check out iMapInvasives, an online and phone app on which sightings of invasive species can be reported. This enables you to become a citizen scientist to help experts plot the range and prevalence of specific species.

The NYS DEC prohibited plant list consists of 69 invasive plants. They include common plants that may surprise you, including the Norway maple, honeysuckle, Japanese barberry (which harbors ticks and their mouse carriers), burning bush, and winged euonymous. 

Brian Eshenaur of Cornell's New York State Integrated Pest Management Program recommends a list of alternatives for your yard. They include:

-Weigela, also known as Midnight Wire

-Ninebark, both the Diablo and Little Devil varieties

-A specific cultivar of Japanese barberry that produces no fruit

-Pagoda dogwood

-Witch hazel (which blooms in very early spring)

-Bottlebrush buckeye (which flowers in mid-summer)

-big bluestem

-Northern bayberry (which is also salt and deer resistant)

-Holly (including a deciduous variety)

-Inkberry holly

-American arborvitae (but the deer do eat this one)

-Red osier dogwood (which has gorgeous red branches in winter)

-Chokeberry

-Fothergilla (with its pretty blooms and red fall color).

Helping the Westchester Parks Foundation

The Westchester Parks Foundation, a nonprofit organization, welcomes volunteers to help remove invasive plants through August 15. For details and to register, go to thewpf.org/. Please consider joining them! 

You may find that pulling invasive plants is a perfect way to stay safe while working with others in a fun, satisfying outdoor activity.

And if you're not quite ready for that level of adventure, you might consider making a donation. Volunteer projects like those I joined would not be possible without generous contributions to pay for canoes, life vests, and other equipment. There's even a mechanical harvester that effectively and quickly removes water chestnuts from lake surfaces, but it's expensive. 

With additional support, the Westchester Parks Foundation hopes to use it more often. That would help enormously in permanently eradicating the water chestnut from Tibbetts Brook Park.

The Westchester Parks Foundation's limited staff maintains 50 parks, runs programs, and raises funds. It's a herculean effort, but with more people enjoying our local parks during the coronavirus pandemic, we can all be more appreciative of the vital role our parks play in contributing to our health and enjoyment.

To learn more:

Westchester Parks Foundation:

Click here for details on native/invasive plants, how to clean your boat, and how to be a responsible pet owner: 

Cornell's New York State Pest Management Program 

Lower Hudson PRISM


Photos courtesy Ellen Edwards


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 

 

 
Pet of the Week: Toast PDF Print Email

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By Allison Roesser

Aug. 12, 2020: There is just something about Toast that can’t help but make you smile. Far from being shy, this loving kitten will seek you out for playtime and is always eager to receive a belly rub or scratch behind the ear. 

Toast is impossible to ignore, but you wouldn’t want to anyway. She has an irrepressible joy and exuberance about her that is both comforting and reassuring. Just being around this little girl will bring a smile to your face and a warmth to your heart. 

Toast is a healthy, young, domestic-short-hair who is wonderful with children, dogs, and other cats. She is fully litter-box trained, spayed, and up to date with her vaccinations. 

For more information about this spunky kitten, please visit PawsCrossedNY.org, email  CLOAKING  or call 914-372-7878


 

 
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