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Art, Drama, Music and Books
Art, drama, music & books

Ann Goldstein, Acclaimed Translator, to Speak on January 8 PDF Print Email

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By Margaret Mager, President, and Irena Choi Stern, Publicity Chair, Friends of the Bronxville Public Library


Nov. 14, 2018:  The Friends of the Bronxville Public Library will host Ann Goldstein, the translator and the public face of the secretive, critically acclaimed author Elena Ferrante, on the evening of Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at Concordia College’s Sommer Center for Worship and the Performing Arts.

Ms. Goldstein will be interviewed by Bronxville’s Sissel McCarthy, distinguished lecturer and director of the journalism program at Hunter College. Furthermore, an HBO eight-episode seriesMy Brilliant Friend, based on the first novel in the Neapolitan Quartet by Elena Ferrante, is set to premiere on Sunday, November 18, at 9:00 pm.

Ms. Goldstein is a rock star of the translation world. Her translations of Ferrante's Neapolitan series have sold more than a million copies worldwide, making her one of the most sought-after translators of Italian literature.

“We are honored and thrilled to host someone of Ann Goldstein’s stature,” said Margaret Mager, president of the Friends of the Bronxville Public Library ("FOBPL"). “And we would like to give special thanks to Bronxville’s Susanne Shoemaker for connecting us to Ms. Goldstein. Elena Ferrante’s novels are one of life’s great book-related pleasures, and it may not have been possible to read them in English without Ms. Goldstein.”

In addition to Ferrante’s novels, Ms. Goldstein has translated works by writers such as Primo Levi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Jhumpa Lahiri and has edited The Complete Works of Primo Levi. She has been the recipient of the PEN/Renato Poggioli Translation Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and awards from the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 2016, her translation of Ferrante’s The Story of a Lost Child was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize honoring international novels in translation. Alongside her career in translation, Ms. Goldstein was an editor at The New Yorker.

The event on January 8 is open to the public, but registration is required. Click here to register. There will be a special reserved section for FOBPL donors. Click here to donate to FOBPL.

For more information, email CLOAKING .

Pictured here: Ann Goldstein

Photo by E. Tammy Kim

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
Bronxville High School Students Selected for Area All-State Music Ensembles PDF Print Email

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Contributed by Michael Ganci, Syntax, for The Bronxville School


Nov. 7, 2018:  A group of talented Bronxville High School students has been invited to perform with Westchester County School Music Association’s area all-state music ensembles at the 2018 festival concert, to be held on November 8 at SUNY Purchase.

Performing with the string orchestra are junior Sofia Ricciarini (violin) and sophomores Patrick Bird (string bass) and Eve Sullivan (viola). They will participate in a performance of Finale from Sinfonia for Strings by William Eckfeld and Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis by Ralph Vaughn Williams.

Performing with the symphony orchestra are juniors Justin Barr (viola), Sabrina Mellinghoff (cello), and Sasha Paradise (cello) and sophomore George Daher (violin). They will participate in a performance of Zampa Overture by Ferdinand Hérold, “Komm, susser Tod” by Johann Sebastian Bach and Leopold Stokowski, and Prelude to Die Meistersinger by Richard Wagner.

Senior Sophia Sulimirski (oboe) will participate in a performance by the band of Symphony No. 1 by Johan de Meij, Riften Wed by Julie Giroux, Candide Suite by Leonard Bernstein and Clare Grundman, and Camerado by Michael Markowski.

Senior Matthew Pytosh (baritone) and sophomore Izaak Thoms (bass) were selected to perform with the mixed chorus. The chorus will perform “God of Life” by Franz Joseph Haydn and Robert Scholz, “The Ground” by Ola Gjeilo, “Ride the Chariot” by William Melton, and “Let the River Run” by Carly Simon and Craig Hella Johnson.

Senior Lily Vorbach (soprano) will perform with the women’s chorus “Weep, O Mine Eyes” by John Bennet and Russell Robinson, “Songbird” by Sarah Quartel, “Amani, A Song of Peace” by Jim Papoulis, “Praise His Holy Name” by Keith Hampton, and “Oseh Shalom” by Adam Paltrowitz.

“Being selected to participate in an area all-state music ensemble is a significant accomplishment that affords students the opportunity to perform challenging works under the direction of exceptional conductors,” orchestra director Denise Lutter said. “The music faculty is proud of the students’ achievements.”

Performers were chosen by the Westchester County School Music Association on the basis of auditions at last spring’s New York State School Music Association Solo Festival. During the audition, the students sight-read, play scales, and perform a solo from NYSSMA’s most challenging repertoire. WCSMA, which is the county arm of NYSSMA, sponsors the area all-state festival each year for eligible Westchester sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Photo courtesy The Bronxville School


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
The Bronxville Conservancy’s 20th-Anniversary Gala Celebration a Success: See Photos PDF Print Email

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By Ellen de Saint Phalle, Member, Board of Trustees, The Bronxville Historical Conservancy


Oct. 31, 2018:  Bronxville Historical Conservancy co-chairs Erin Saluti and Bill Zambelli had gathered 180 guests for the unveiling of a recent acquisition of a winter landscape painting by Henry Hobart Nichols.

CLICK HERE to see some great photos from the gala by photographer Kalil Salkey.

Following some introductory remarks by Saluti and founding lifetime co-chair Marilynn Hill, the velvet curtain was removed, and the crowd gasped to find a framed emoji cartoon rather than the original Nichols painting. Working quickly to secure the crime scene, Chief Satriale assured the crowd that the mystery would be solved and the painting returned before the evening was over. This was not reported on the Bronxville police blotter because this elaborate ruse was part of "Framed," the Conservancy’s 20th-anniversary gala celebration.

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"Framed" gala chairs Erin Saluti, Suzanne Pratt Davis, Judy Foley, and Michelle McBride and their creative committee of Tina Adams, Hilary Blumenreich, Lisa Rao, Jennifer Russo, and Lyndal Vermette were the clever schemers behind the bogus heist, producing a genuine evening of entertainment and fun. Guests were treated to an interactive murder-mystery performance, threaded through cocktails and a sit-down dinner. Table assignments quickly turned into investigative teams competing to solve the crime and catch the culprit. Team members mulled about the room, collecting clues and interviewing suspects. The surprising suspects included Bronxville’s own Mayor Mary Marvin as Princess Vespa, Dale Walker as Laura Crafty, Betsy Putnam as Mabel, Annette Healey as Virginia Beach, Molly Bianco as Anita Bath, Peter Thorp as Luke Warm, Jon Davis as Max Power, and Scott Samios as Skip Rope.

After convincing the crowd of their alibis, the princess, Laura Crafty, Virginia Beach, Anita Bath, Luke Warm, Max Power, and Skip Rope were eliminated as suspects and applauded for their compelling performances.  Although turning in a terrific performance, Mabel, aka Betsy Putman, could not fool the crowd and was ultimately charged. With the crime solved, the original painting was returned and finally presented to the crowd.

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Hill and art historian and curator Jayne Warman concluded the evening with the true and accurate account of the special painting and its artist. Henry Hobart Nichols (1869-1962), born in Washington, D.C., was the son of a noted wood engraver. He studied in both Washington and Paris. In 1910, he bought a large plot of land overlooking Sunny Brook in Lawrence Park West, built a house, and settled in Bronxville until his death. He contributed much to the artistic life of the village and to the New York art world. Nichols was highly respected among his peers for his integrity, sincerity, and high idealism. He served as president of the National Academy of Design, a trustee of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and a director of the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation. Winter’s Day will hang in Bronxville Village Hall as a part of the Conservancy’s collection of Bronxville artwork.

Eleanor Pennell, a former member and longtime Bronxville resident, bequeathed the painting to the Conservancy. Pennell died in January of this year. The gift reflects her commitment to the Conservancy and the Bronxville community and serves as a lasting legacy inspiring future generations.

As guests left the gala celebration, each was presented with a postcard image of the Nichols painting, a box of chocolates, and the guest's photo mug shot, which was taken during the evening’s investigation. 

Pictured here:  At top: The committee that organized the "Framed" event; second photo, Winter's Day by Henry Hobart Nichols; third photo, William Zambelli, co-chair, The Bronxville Historical Conservancy.

Photos in article and in link by Kalil Salkey


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
Christian Klose, Author of 'Frack this!' and Bronxville Resident, to Speak at Bronxville Library October 25 PDF Print Email

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By Margaret Mager, President, and Irena Choi Stern, Publicity Chair, Friends of the Bronxville Public Library


Oct. 24, 2018:  Dr. Christian D. Klose’s book Frack this!: The Untold Story about Earthquakes Caused by Humans unveils the shocking facts that humans can cause earthquakes. With illustrations, charts, and tables, Dr. Klose, as a distinguished researcher, brings together leading-edge discoveries from top scientists around the world. With worrisome clarity, Dr. Klose describes in simple terms and in a nontechnical language the fundamental concept of human-caused earthquakes and their root causes. He shows how everyone can lay the groundwork to keep earthquake risks in perspective and how to stay safe.

This groundbreaking book provides numerous examples of evidence ranging from tremors induced by the new fracking technology for producing oil and natural gas to earthquakes caused by secret nuclear underground tests that were performed in the US and the former Soviet Union since 1955. Other examples include mining earthquakes causing billions of dollars in damages and devastating earthquakes caused by the filling of artificial water reservoirs, such as the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China that took more than 68,000 lives. Without opposing any of these technologies, Dr. Klose illuminates associated risks. Frack this! provides practical, insightful, and engaging knowledge for everyone who is affected by or wants to know more about earthquakes caused by humans. Written in everyday language, at 174 pages the book is a quick and enlightening read on a fascinating and important topic.

Dr. Klose, a Bronxville resident, is an expert on natural hazards. As a research scientist, he has worked at several renowned institutions, including Columbia University in New York, ETH in Zurich, and Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto. Many of his research papers have been featured in the popular media, such as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Economist, and National Geographic, to name a few.

Dr. Klose will be speaking at the Bronxville Public Library on Thursday, October 25, 2018, at 7:00 pm in the Yeager Room; the talk will be followed by a reception. The event is free and open to the public. Registration is appreciated. Click here to register

Copies of Dr. Klose’s book are available at the Bronxville Public Library. Dr. Klose has generously provided that all proceeds from book sales at the library will directly benefit the library. 

If you have any questions, please contact  CLOAKING . Please support the library by becoming a friend. Click here to Donate to FOBPL.  

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
Met Curator to Discuss Art and Culture of Ancient Armenia at OSilas Gallery Tuesday, October 30 PDF Print Email

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By Elizabeth Vranka, Executive Director, OSilas Gallery & Art Studio


Oct. 24, 2018:  Curator Dr. Helen Evans, who organized the Armenia! exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, will speak at OSilas Gallery on Tuesday, October 30, at 7:30 pm. Dr. Evans will be discussing the historical and cultural heritage of a nation bearing one of the world’s ancient cultures and the importance of Armenian art to the world’s art. The presentation will be illustrated with images from the exhibition.

Armenia!, which recently opened and will be on view at The Met through January 13, explores the art and culture of the Armenians from their conversion to Christianity in the early fourth century through their leading role on international trade routes in the 17th century. Dr. Evans is the Mary and Michael Jaharis Curator of Byzantine Art, Department of Medieval Art and The Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

Tickets are required and are $25 per person ($20 for OSilas Gallery members). Light refreshments will be provided. Please click here to purchase your tickets or call Elizabeth Vranka at 914-337-9300, ext. 2173, to make your reservations.  

The exhibition Our Rights, Our Freedoms, Always: Celebrating Human Rights Through the Camera Lens is currently on view at OSilas Gallery.

Photo courtesy Elizabeth Vranka, Executive Director, OSilas Gallery & Art Studio

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
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