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Miabella Rose Rodriguez is First Baby Born at NYP Lawrence Hospital in 2019 PDF Print Email

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By Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital


Jan. 9, 2019:  NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital welcomed the hospital's first baby delivered in 2019.

Miabella Rose Rodriguez was born to Darline Pinto at 10:51 am on January 1, 2019. The baby girl was 4 pounds, 13 ounces and 18 inches long. She was delivered by Dr. Elizabeth Paskowski, an obstetrician/gynecologist who practices at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville

Ms. Pinto, who lives in Worcester, Massachusetts, was 36 weeks pregnant and visiting family in the Bronx when she began having labor pains on New Year's Eve. The next thing she knew, she was in the hospital preparing to deliver her first child.

NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital's maternity center offers 23 private, hotel-like post-partum rooms complete with bathrooms and showers, flat-screen televisions, and free Internet. The rooms are designed for maximum comfort with relaxing colors, soft lighting, carpeted floors, and special reclining chair/beds for partners. The maternity center also features a state-of-the-art nursery for newborns and a new neonatal intensive care nursery for babies with special needs or those who are born prematurely. NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital provides support for breastfeeding mothers with an on-site lactation specialist and follow-up support after discharge. The hospital delivers an average of 1,300 babies annually.

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff. 

 

 
Carolers Serenade Patients at NYP Lawrence Hospital PDF Print Email

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by Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital

Dec. 19, 2018:  This past weekend, Concordia Conservatory Carolers and NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital executives (pictured here) serenaded patients and hospital staff. 

Other Bronxville organizations spreading holiday cheer at Lawrence Hospital this holiday season included the Bronxville Chamber of Commerce and the Bronxville Middle School Orchestra.

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff. 

 
Fifty-five Community Members Attend 'Cocktails & Conversation' at Carol H. Taylor Breast Health Center PDF Print Email

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By Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital


Nov. 14, 2018: In honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital hosted "Cocktails & Conversation" on October 17 at its Carol H. Taylor Breast Health Center.

Hosted by Bronxville residents Lansing MartinelliJennie JacobsWendy Fahy, and Mary Taylor Behrens, the event gathered 55 community members to tour the state-of-the-art center, which received the 2018 Women's Choice Award as one of America's Best Breast Centers and to hear from NYP Lawrence president Michael J. Fosina, MPH, FACHE, and the center's director, Lynn Chinitz, MD. 

The center is named after Carol Hunter Taylor, mother of Mary Taylor Behrens and an active Bronxville resident for 42 years, whose extended family and friends helped contribute the seed money for the facility. 

Pictured here (L to R): Co-host Wendy Fahy; co-host Lansing Martinelli; NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital Carol H. Taylor Breast Health Center director Lynn Chinitz, MD; NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital president Michael Fosina; co-host and NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital board member Mary Taylor Behrens; co-host Jennie Jacobs.

Photo courtesy Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital 

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
Seniors and Their Adult Children Should Talk and Plan PDF Print Email

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By Ellen Edwards, Member, Board of Directors, The Counseling Center


Nov. 14, 2018:  On Tuesday, November 6, The Counseling Center sponsored an insightful, highly relevant lecture and discussion for Bronxville Senior Citizens titled "Seniors: Invisible Conversations™ with Their Adult Children,” held at The Reformed Church of Bronxville. The talk was led by Rev. Shannon White, author of The Invisible Conversations With Your Aging Parents, and Lynn Evansohn, a licensed clinical social worker at The Counseling Center.

Rev. Shannon White’s many encounters with parishioners have impressed upon her how difficult it can be for seniors to discuss with their adult children issues related to aging. These can be sensitive, even painful, conversations about seniors’ changing (often rapidly changing) health needs, questions to do with financing their care, where they will live, and their wishes for handling the end of life, including their funeral arrangements. What remains unsaid, for whatever reason, can lead to financial losses and emotional complications that could have been avoided. Often, too, families want to build strong connections with each other but find that desire thwarted by their inability to venture into sensitive terrain.

According to White, fully 75% of seniors expect their children to carry out their end-of-life wishes, but they have never actually articulated what those wishes are. And when essential documents don’t get written, or can’t be found, children can end up squabbling over their inheritance and estates can remain unsettled for years.

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White suggests that families write things down—not just wills and living wills but also the parents’ medical history, medications with dosages, how care will be paid for (especially if the kids are expected to help out), and what kind of care is needed now. White suggests that parents might need help keeping an eye on their alcohol consumption since alcohol is less well tolerated as we age and can interact with many medications.

She encourages families to confront “unfinished business” while there’s still time and she shared her own experience with her father, with whom she was able to have a brief but deeply meaningful conversation shortly before he died. Having already worked through many of her conflicted feelings for him, she was able to express her love and forgiveness, a gift that gave him greater peace at the end and allowed her greater acceptance—something her siblings, who hadn’t done the work of “unfinished business,” weren’t necessarily able to share.

White recommends the Five Wishes Living Will, readily available online, which requires the answers to five questions related to your end-of-life arrangements and, once completed, is considered a legally viable document. 

Lynn Evansohn began her part of the discussion with a story illustrating the idea that a conversation is often as much about listening as it is about speaking. As a young social worker, she was asked to convince a couple in their 80s who could no longer adequately care for their large menagerie of cats and dogs to arrange to give up their animals. Only when the couple showed no willingness to do so did she begin to pick up on why—they’d been circus performers in their youth and animals were a cherished part of their life together. By listening more closely, Evansohn realized that she needed to shift her focus away from her own agenda to what the couple actually needed, in this case, animal caregivers to come to the home. 

Sometimes, Evansohn said, a third party such as a pastor, friend, or professional therapist can facilitate a conversation that the parents and children are unable to have on their own. She recalled a man she was counseling who stubbornly insisted on acting as sole caregiver for his ill wife, whom he loved dearly. He refused to see how his wife’s overwhelming needs were taking a serious toll on his own health until his children demanded a meeting with their father and Evansohn. With Evansohn as a neutral professional presence, the man was finally able to hear his children’s pleas that they loved him and didn’t want to lose him through worry and overwork, just when they were already losing their mother.

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Sometimes we think we’ve had certain conversations with our family members, but we actually haven’t, Evansohn said. This became clear to her when her mother, 96, suffered a life-threatening incident. She recovered, but when Evansohn contacted her brother in the midst of the crisis, trying to prepare him for their mother’s possible death, she was shocked to hear him say, “I’m not ready.” This, despite their many conversations about their mother’s situation over the years. Subsequent conversations revealed how much her brother, who lived several states away, missed his mother and regretted the infrequency of their visits. Six months later, Evansohn’s family moved their mom to live near her brother. 

White said it’s important to acknowledge the tremendous grief associated with aging—over the loss of friends, loss of abilities. When children refuse to have the conversation parents try to initiate, Evansohn suggested that it can be helpful to ask if they might be ready to hear “one thing.” That one thing is sometimes enough to open up an ongoing conversation that unfolds over time. People experience grief and loss very differently, Evansohn said, and some people get stuck in their grief. In such cases, a professional can often help them get unstuck. 

The Counseling Center offers a warm, safe, and confidential place to get help. It has offices in The Reformed Church of Bronxville, as well as in Scarsdale, Riverdale, and New York City. For more information, visit www.counselingcenter.org or call its clinical director, Dr. Jane Benjamin, at 914-793-3388.

The Bronxville Senior Citizens meets at The Reformed Church of Bronxville on Tuesdays and Thursdays for a wide variety of activities. Anyone age 55 years and up is welcome. For more information, visit www.bronxvilleseniors.org.

Pictured here:  Top (L to R): Shannon White and Lynn Evansohn; second (L to R): Karla Diserens, Shannon White, Lynn Evansohn, and Virgil Roberson; third: Shannon White.

Photos courtesy The Counseling Center

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.



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The Counseling Center to Honor Rosanne Welshimer at Annual Benefit PDF Print Email

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By Ellen Edwards, Member, Board of Directors, The Counseling Center


Nov. 7, 2018:  The Counseling Center will host its 48th annual benefit on Friday, May 3, 2019, at the Bronxville Field Club. This year’s event honors Rosanne Welshimer, whose commitment to community service, lived out with energy and good cheer, has enriched so many people in Bronxville and beyond.

Rosanne’s volunteer work began as a tutor while attending Mount Holyoke College and continued during her long, stellar career at The Bank of New York, where many of her 38 years there were spent as senior vice president and division head for the bank’s securities industry banking division.

Early on, she taught church school and baked for the soup kitchen at The Reformed Church of Bronxville; remarkably, she continued as a monthly cookie baker for the soup kitchen for 26 years, and after 34 years, she still teaches fourth-grade church school. 

Soon after leaving banking, through Neighborhood Coalition for Shelter, she became a mentor and scholarship supporter of several youths as they aged out of the foster care system. Further, she has held many lay leadership positions at The Reformed Church of Bronxville: as chair of several councils, deacon, elder, and vice president and acting president of consistory. In addition, Rosanne served as president of the board of the Bronxville Public Library and as chair of the board of The Counseling Center, where she was on the board from 2011 to 2018.

In all of these roles, Rosanne brought compassion and focus, an eye for detail, and an enduring warmth. Over the years, she and her husband, Mark, have supported many local organizations with a focus on wellness, education, and faith. The mother of four children and grandmother of six, Rosanne delights in spending time with her family. She also enjoys gardening and cooking and is famous for her scrumptious chocolate chip cookies.

Thanks to the generosity of four families who are sponsoring this year’s benefit, all of the proceeds from this event will go to support the important work of The Counseling Center, especially its fee subsidy program, which allows the center’s professional staff to offer critical services, including psychotherapy, marriage counseling, family and child therapy, and pastoral counseling, to those who are unable to afford full-fee treatment.

“We want to help all those in need,” said Carol Godfrey, chair of the board. “For anyone facing a difficult moment in life, no matter what their age or the kind of challenge they face, The Counseling Center can be a vital resource. The exceptional psychotherapists on our staff stand out for their many years of experience. And through a well-funded fee subsidy program, we can offer our expertise to more people, making a positive difference in their lives and in those whose lives they touch.”

Virgil Roberson, LP, MDiv, NCPsyA, executive director of The Counseling Center, said: “Some come to the center with serious mental health challenges, including major depression, anxiety/panic disorder, eating disorders, bipolar illness, self-injury, or addiction. We specialize in treating those serious difficulties and many others—sometimes in short-term-focused psychotherapy and, when appropriate, in longer-term, more intensive therapy. But many clients seek help with the normal rough spots of life. All of us face difficult situations, and often it helps to speak to an objective, impartial person who is not a friend or family member. The Counseling Center provides expert assistance in those situations, too. Sometimes in just a few sessions, clients find the clarity and reassurance they are seeking.”

Godfrey, added, “The upcoming benefit offers an opportunity for people to reacquaint themselves with the terrific contribution The Counseling Center makes to the community. I’m excited by this chance to continue our outreach and expand our fee-subsidy program. And I’m especially excited to honor Rosanne Welshimer, whose leadership, dedication, and warm friendship over the years have helped ensure that The Counseling Center remains a welcome resource.”

The Counseling Center offers a warm, safe, and confidential place to get help. It has offices in The Reformed Church of Bronxville, as well as in Scarsdale, Riverdale, and New York City. For more information, visit www.counselingcenter.org or call its clinical director, Dr. Jane Benjamin, at 914-793-3388.

Pictured here: Rosanne Welshimer.

Photo courtesy Ellen Edwards, Member, Board of Directors, The Counseling Center


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
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