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Food, Games, Fitness and Family Fun at Be Well Bash on September 15 PDF Print Email

By Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender for NYP-Lawrence Hospital

Sep. 4, 2019:  The 2nd Annual NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital Be Well Bash will be bigger and better this year. The event takes place on Sunday, September 15th from noon-3pm on the front lawn of The Bronxville School.  (Rain date: Saturday, September 21st) Interactive activities include:

NFL PLAY 60 Skills and Drills:  Kids can test their skills in a QB/WR challenge and complete a circuit workout featuring tire tosses, tackling dummies and more.

New York City Football Club Street Team: Get ready to show your soccer skills with the New York City Football Club Street Team’s inflatable kickwall accuracy challenge and have an XBox One FIFA video game tournament. NewYork-Presbyterian is the Official Hospital of NYCFC.

Delicious Food: Sample healthy snacks and tasty treats from a variety of local food vendors, including Ladle of Love, The Taco Project, Booskerdoo Fresh Roasted Coffee, Root & Vine, Nutmeg and The Bronxville Diner will be providing tastings or beverage samples.

Family Fun: Enjoy a day filled with face painting, balloon animals, great music and fitness fun.

Concordia College Care Clinic:  Kids be sure to bring your dolls, teddy bears, action figures or any stuffed toy to the Concordia College Care Clinic.  Our team of nursing and rad tech specialists will give your special friend a wellness check up, x-ray, and offer tips for keeping your doll or superhero ready for the next adventure.  So if your doll, stuffed animal or action figure needs a little TLC, stop by the Concordia Care Clinic. 

Free Workout Classes:

1 PM Bronxville Wellness Sanctuary’s Guided Meditation & Gentle Yoga Led by Stephanie Filardi, co-owner

*residents should bring their own yoga mats

2 PM Pure Barre’s AB Crunch Demonstration Led by Hollis Fuller Morris 

NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence: Learn tips on staying healthy and active from doctors and specialists in sports medicine, family medicine, cardiology and nutrition. Engage with doctors from NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Group Westchester and ColumbiaDoctors, including Columbia Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, team doctors of the New York Yankees and New York City Football Club.

Plus more! For more information click here.


Photo courtesy NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
Everyday Tips to Prevent Lyme Disease PDF Print Email

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By Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital

Aug. 7, 2019:  Tick season is upon us, and the threat of tick-borne disease is on the rise. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2004 and 2017, the number of reported cases nearly tripled, and researchers discovered seven new tick-borne pathogens with the potential to infect people.

However, with common sense, simple precautions, and vigilance, you and your loved ones can still enjoy time outdoors this summer. Dr. David Goldberg, a board-certified internist and infectious disease specialist at NewYork-Presbyterian Medical Group Westchester and an assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University Medical Center, offers tips on how to keep you and your loved ones safe from tick bites and what to do in the event of a bite.

What should you do if you’ve been bitten by a tick?

Remove the tick by its head with a pair of tweezers. If you cannot remove all the body parts, you should see a doctor to complete the removal. 

If the tick has been attached for under 24 hours, there is no need for any treatment. The tick must be attached for at least 24 hours (generally longer) to transmit the Lyme disease bacteria.

If it’s possible that the tick was attached for more than 24 hours, you should call your health care provider. In general, the treatment is one dose of doxycycline as a preemptive treatment (call your doctor for a prescription) (see below for more about treatment).

How can someone tell if they have Lyme disease?

The classic Lyme disease symptom is a gradually expanding red rash, usually flat or only slightly raised, with sharp margins and often (but not always) less redness in the center (the so-called “bullseye” rash). However, many people do not report the rash, either because they don’t have it or because it’s on a part of the body that they cannot see.

In many cases, people experience flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, muscle aches, joint pains, and malaise. If these symptoms occur in the late spring or summer when the flu season has ended and the Lyme season has begun, you should see a physician for possible Lyme disease.

What precautions can people take to protect themselves from Lyme disease?

The most important way to prevent Lyme disease is to perform a thorough tick check, top to bottom and front to back, in the evening after a day outdoors. If the tick is removed the same day, it’s virtually impossible to get Lyme disease. You should be sure to have a good pair of tweezers on hand. You’ll need either a full-length mirror or the help of a relative or good friend in order to examine the parts of your body you are unable to see.

All children should be thoroughly examined for ticks after a day outdoors if they have spent it in an area where Lyme disease may occur.

You can also apply insect repellent to lower the risk of tick bites. If it isn’t too hot outside, you can wear long sleeves and long pants to protect yourself from tick bites. Ticks do not fly (they quest on the top of tall grasses), so you can also reduce your risk by not lying down in wooded areas.

How is Lyme disease treated?

Early Lyme disease can be successfully treated with an oral antibiotic, either doxycycline, amoxicillin, or cefuroxime. Doxycycline is usually the first choice since it also treats certain other bacteria transmitted by ticks such as Anaplasma and Ehrlichia. The antibiotic is generally given for 21 days, though there is evidence that a 10- or 14-day course of doxycycline may be as effective as a longer course.

If the oral antibiotic is started promptly, the risk of one of the late complications of Lyme disease is extremely low.

Most of the late complications of Lyme disease (with the notable exception of Bell’s palsy) are treated with an intravenous antibiotic, usually ceftriaxone. This is generally managed by a specialist with expertise in Lyme disease.

Pictured here: Dr. David Goldberg. 

Photo courtesy NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital


Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital to Host 2nd Annual Be Well Bash Community Event On September 15 PDF Print Email

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By Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NYP-Lawrence Hospital

Jul. 31, 2019:  NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital will host the second annual Be Well Bash on Sunday, September 15, from noon to 3:00 pm on the front lawn of The Bronxville School. (Rain date: Saturday, September 21). The free wellness and injury-prevention event is geared toward all members of the community including families, student-athletes, weekend warriors, and seniors.

Members of surrounding communities are encouraged to attend to meet experts from Columbia Orthopedics, including sports medicine providers, and specialists in primary care, cardiology, and other specialties to learn how to stay healthy and achieve their fitness goals. The afternoon will be filled with activities like the NFL PLAY 60 Skills and Drills and the New York City Football Club Street Team; injury prevention workshops; a cooking demonstration; music; food; entertainment; face painting; and giveaways.

The Be Well Bash is sponsored by NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital with support from the Village of Bronxville and the Bronxville Chamber of Commerce.  The Be Well Bash Committee members are: Mayor Mary Marvin, Village of Bronxville; Jim Palmer, Bronxville village administrator; Nicole Tuck, director, Bronxville Chamber of Commerce; Ellen Bloom, director of community affairs, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital and NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital; Alisa Holland, manager, community affairs, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital; Maggie DeLuca, Westchester regional administrator, Columbia University Orthopedic Surgery Department; Karen Peterson, Bronxville schools athletic director; Dr. Roy Montesano, Bronxville schools superintendent; Joyce Kennedy, senior director of community relations, Concordia College; Susan Crane, director of Student Health Services, Concordia College; Amy Rutter Korb, executive director, The Community Fund; Elizabeth Bracken-Thompson, Thompson & Bender; Jennifer Hommeyer, Ph.D., B*Well Chair at Bronxville School; Jenn Redman, Bronxville School Council; and Jennifer Lampert, partner, Ladle of Love.

Pictured here (top to bottom, L to R):  James Guiney, senior coordinator, Media & Community Engagement, Thompson & Bender; Alisa Holland, manager, community affairs, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital; Maggie DeLuca, Westchester regional administrator, Columbia University Orthopedic Surgery Department; Ellen Bloom, director of community affairs, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital and NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital; Mayor Mary Marvin, Village of Bronxville; Amy Rutter Korb, executive director, The Community Fund; Nicole Tuck, director, Bronxville Chamber of Commerce; and Elizabeth Bracken-Thompson, Thompson & Bender.

Photo courtesy NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 



 

 

 
Leading Vascular Neurologist Named Stroke Director of NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital PDF Print Email

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By Josefa Paganuzzi, Thompson & Bender, for NYP-Lawrence Hospital

Jul. 24, 2019:  Dr. Ugo Paolucci has been named stroke director of NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital. Dr. Paolucci, a leading vascular neurologist, will also serve as an assistant professor of neurology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons.

“I am delighted to welcome Dr. Paolucci to NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital,” said Michael Fosina, MPH, FACHE, president of NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital. “Dr. Paolucci is a highly accomplished physician and researcher, and his skill and expertise will advance stroke care and make a difference in the lives of our patients.”

In his new role, Dr. Paolucci will continue to expand the stroke program at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, nurture top talent, advance clinical and research innovation, and educate the next generation of vascular neurologists on new methods for delivering life-saving stroke care.

Dr. Paolucci has a strong interest in the management of stroke and other acute cerebrovascular emergencies, as well as participating in related clinical research trials. He has been published in several peer-reviewed journals on a variety of subjects and has spoken at national and international stroke and neurology conferences.

“I am very excited to be joining an institution that has such an esteemed legacy in providing world-class care,” said Dr. Paolucci. “I consider it a privilege to take on this new role and build upon this foundation of offering the highest-quality stroke care to the patients and residents of Westchester.”

Dr. Paolucci joins NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital from Hackensack Meridian Health, where he served as a cerebrovascular disease specialist, and he previously held positions at Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine.

After earning his medical degree from the University of Bologna Faculty of Medicine in Italy, Dr. Paolucci completed a research fellowship at the Burke Medical Research Institute in New York. He did his internship and neurology residency at New York Medical College, followed by a vascular neurology fellowship at New Jersey Medical School and a neurointerventional fellowship with the Seton Hall University School of Health and Medical Sciences. He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the North American Spine Society.

The addition of Dr. Paolucci will expand the stroke program at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, a New York State Department of Health-designated Stroke Center where patients receive the highest quality of care. The stroke program at NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital has also received the American Heart and Stroke Association’s 2018 Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke GOLD PLUS Quality Achievement Award and Target: Stroke™ Honor Roll. These awards recognize the hospital’s commitment and success in providing stroke patients with the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Pictured here:  Dr. Ugo Paolucci.

Photo courtesy NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 

 

 
Retirement Is a Process: Things to Think About and Consider PDF Print Email

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By Catherine Nicholas, LCSW, and Richard W. Shoup, DMin, The Counseling Center

Jun. 26, 2019:  Perhaps you can’t wait to retire. You plan meticulously and count down the days. Or perhaps you are so happy with your work, and find such satisfaction in it, you approach your mid-60s with no intention of slowing down. But at some point, a serious consideration of retirement usually becomes inevitable. Retirement might be forced on you by mandatory age limits or because declining strength and mobility make it necessary. If you’ve enjoyed work, you might begin to ask yourself what has made it meaningful, and as you work less, how you can keep doing it in a different way. You might experience a renewed appreciation of the “goodness” you’ve found in helping people or making a contribution and look for other ways to continue doing that.

Some jobs afford the flexibility to step back from professional lives while still remaining in them. Some people give up executive positions, for example, while returning to the roles that first brought them to the profession. Others reduce their hours to one or two days a week. The chance to remain among well-known, respected colleagues while continuing to contribute your skill and experience can be immensely rewarding. So, too, you might find yourself becoming the “wisdom figure” whom others come to for advice and counsel. Those who switch to part-time work often find it gives structure to their days while also affording the freedom to pursue relationships and other interests. 

But many people with full-time jobs don’t have the luxury of cutting back. For them, you’re either all-in or all-out. You might have little control over your work environment, be unable to change or escape difficult situations, and feel very eager for retirement. Yet you face a startling change once you make the leap, one that requires some forethought. Having a general idea of what you want to do in retirement can get you started, but it’s best to leave many aspects unplanned so that you have the flexibility to make new choices along the way.  

It can help to see retirement as a changing time of life, a process, not a goal. People often feel they need to fill every hour of every day, but that can put unnecessary pressure on them. Instead, give yourself a chance to figure it out, and permission to let it evolve. It is ok to feel at sea or lost immediately following retirement. Out of that uncertainty, new ideas and goals can form. In some cases, it can be useful to seek out a trained therapist who can guide you along the way, assisting you in defining your interests and steering you clear of potential pitfalls.  

No doubt, throughout life you’ve had to adapt to changing circumstances. You may have confronted illness, divorce, great loss. You might have suffered professional challenges and reversals. Retirement can be seen as another transition, a period in which to appreciate what you’ve had, feel grateful for it, and learn to let go when the time is right.

Often when one steps back from a professional role, whether partly or completely, the lessening of status and influence are keenly felt. Consider the example of a highly respected dentist with a long, successful career who was forced out of his practice at the age of 75 and never recovered his lost sense of purpose. Yet sometimes just as the old falls away, new opportunities open up: offers of professional or volunteer work that arise from previous experience, for example, or new causes and interests you’ve only recently discovered. Sometimes, just as you begin to lose status and influence, they may begin to seem less worth pursuing in any case; gradually, you may find deeper meaning in furthering your relationships, whether it’s with family and friends or in casual interactions. Often at this stage of life, daily tasks and ordinary work take on new significance. 

Retirement can be a time to try new things. You might take courses, join a book club, attend music rehearsals, and travel. It can be great fun to finally turn the items on your “bucket list” into actual experiences. Now might also be your chance to enhance your exercise routine or to begin one if you haven’t already. Yoga, for example, can be especially beneficial for older people, a way to stay flexible and steady on your feet. But think hard before you give up an activity since at this age you’re not likely to resume it.

It’s important to guard against the deterioration that can come from isolation by finding ways to remain engaged, even if that means choosing an assisted living facility, which offers many activities, instead of remaining in your own home, or sharing space with your children, where you might be left alone most days. Moving someplace new may require more courage and make you feel uncomfortable at first, but over the long term, it might offer greater well-being and independence.

Where to live is often a question couples don’t agree on. If one of you prefers the city and the other the country, or one likes warm weather year-round and the other enjoys a range of seasons, you might be able to split your time between both. It’s important to know where your spiritual home lies. Be sure you plant yourself in a place where you can do what you really want to do.

Friendships, especially long-standing ones, can add enormous richness to lives in retirement. But as the years go by, it’s inevitable that you will begin to lose friends to illness and death. New friends can be wonderful, but they can’t entirely replace the old since they don’t have that shared history of experience, memories, and of who you were years ago. It’s healthy to recall old friends if doing so makes you grateful for what you had and joyful to be reminded of those good times. Then, go on to find pleasure in new places; find value in new friends.

The two halves of a married couple often approach retirement with very different ideas in mind, yet it is possible to find a middle ground that works for you both. Having each other during the retirement years can allow you to have the kind of unstructured together time that you may not have been able to enjoy for years. Whether you create new cherished routines, such as evening walks together after dinner, or pursue separate interests that you talk about afterward, being able to share these experiences can enliven your days.  

In retirement, you may be married or single, working part-time or fully retired, living in a familiar place or somewhere new. Whatever your situation, if you can summon courage as you move forward and stay open to new possibilities, you may find that these later years are deeply satisfying.

Pictured (rotating):  Richard Shoup and Catherine Nicholas.

Photos courtesy The Counseling Center 

Editor's note: As a public service, MyhometownBronxville publishes articles from local institutions, officeholders, and individuals. MyhometownBronxville does not fact-check statements therein, and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the thinking of its staff.

 
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